P&Q: Sweet Cream Biscuits

Yum. Breakfasts will be very tasty this week. Very tasty indeed.

Go to it.

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27 thoughts on “P&Q: Sweet Cream Biscuits

  1. I’m intrigued to make biscuits with the only fat being cream. Yum!

    I do have a random question about flour though… in the notes about biscuits, Dorie mentions White Lily flour and how for recipes that call for all-purpose flour, if you’re using white lily you should increase the the flour by 2 tbsp per 1 cup.

    But… if you weigh your ingredients instead of measuring them, will the 1 cup weight be the same amount for white lily as it is for regular all purpose? Or will I still need to increase the amounts?

    I use White Lily exclusively and have never heard to increase my flour amounts and now I’m wondering if that’s why I have such an issue with super buttery cookies (sables for example) going all rogue on me and spreading out like crazy.

    Thoughts?

    • From what I can tell, you can use weight with White Lily without increasing it. For my biscuits I used White Lily, and I measured my flour by volume the way Dorie says (adding the extra bit) AND also checked it by weight (using Dorie’s preferred 4.75 oz/cup as my standard, and not adding any) My 1 cup + 2 T did equal 4.75 oz in weight, the way 1 cup of regular all-purpose would. It seems that the White Lily is fluffier/lighter, so it takes a greater volume to get to the correct weight, which is why we have to add a bit when measuring by volume.

      • Well, Valerie, the second hockey season (playoffs) has just begun! Maybe it could be a theme brunch?
        ;)
        I really shouldn’t say anything till I’ve actually tried them…

    • Alton Brown has a biscuit episode of Good Eats that’s really helpful in terms of achieving nice, high biscuits. I haven’t seen it in a loooong time, but the one thing that I remember is that he discusses at length the need to bake the biscuits so that they’re just touching each other on the backing sheet. I never used to do that, and I always had flat biscuits with hard bottoms. Ever since I’ve followed AB’s advice my biscuits have always risen beautifully. I think that the idea is that you don’t want to give them room to spread out. If they can’t spread out, then they’ll rise up!

      • Biscuits scare me! I just stopped at the library and borrowed Alton Brown’s book (I’m Just Here for More Food, the baking book) specifically because it has an extensive biscuit chapter. It didn’t really help me for the sweet potato biscuits, but I’m hopeful this time.

  2. I made these last week and served them with some chicken tenders for dinner. They were delicious!! Light and tender. The next morning I sliced them in half, reheated them in the oven and used them to make sausage and egg biscuits. They were almost as good the next day. :)

  3. I’m going sweet with mine; dressing them up a little to bring into work as a treat for my team…it helps that there was a killer sale on strawberries this weekend :)

  4. I’ve made these biscuits a few times now and never had any trouble with them. I think the key is really to make sure you handle the dough as little and as lightly as possible to minimize getting that ‘puck’ effect. I love making these because they are fast and easy. That said, it has actually taken me several years of making biscuits to get the hang of not over working the dough. Good luck!

  5. i can’t wait to try these tonight! my husband is all set up for some country sausage and gravy over biscuits!

    i’ll probably have some with homemade jam! :)

  6. Hoping to make these in the morning. Finally done with all the wedding cupcake mess and can move on to other baking projects! Woot!

  7. Sorry, Im not going to make it. My dog got away and went on a 2 hour romp. Im now spent and still need to make cupcakes for Brodys preschool for the am. Sorry folks! Next week. Promise.

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